Solution 1 2 3 4 5 6 The Toulmin Model is also another common way to structure an argument This method has seven parts to it Argument 2011
Solution The Toulmin Model is also another common way to structure an argument This method has
Solution The Toulmin Model is also another common way to structure an
is also another common way to structure an argument This method has seven parts to it Argument
Solution The Toulmin Model is also another common way to
structure an argument This method has seven parts to it Argument
Solution The Toulmin Model is also another common
Solution The Toulmin Model
(Solution) 1 2 3 4 5 6 The Toulmin Model is also another common way to structure an argument. This method has seven parts to it ("Argument," 2011):...

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You may think of arguments as negative confrontations where two or more people cannot come to a reasonable resolution of their perceived differences. Argument, though, can be positive in the context of advocating the need for change. While you may be passionate about an idea for change, you will also want to be precise in how you design your argument in order to influence how a person thinks about your idea for change. For this unit’s Discussion, go to the TED.com website ( http://www.ted.com/) and select a speech; you will then analyze the argument made by the speaker. Be sure to select a TED Talks video with a debatable claim so that you are able to address the questions below.Before submitting your post, please review the following article, “How to Support an Argument and Avoid Logical Fallacies,” specifically the Toulmin Model section attached as a word file.You will use the Toulmin Model to analyze the selected video. While the video does not need to relate to your chosen topic, it may help to choose a video that you can use as further evidence in an argument for change in your community or workplace.After reviewing your selected video from TED.com, respond to the following prompts in paragraph format:Identify the claim, type of claim (a claim of policy, claim of value, claim of cause, ethical argument, proposal argument, etc.) , supporting evidence, and assumptions you think the speaker used in his or her argument.  Describe what aspects of the argument you felt were particularly strong or weak. How will you use the Toulmin Model to strengthen an argument for change in your community or workplace (School bullying and school kids cyber bullying)? There is also an attached sample.The Toulmin Model is also another common way to structure an argument. This method has seven parts to it (“Argument,” 2011): 1 Claim: In the simplest terms, a claim is your thesis phrased as an argumentative statement. A claim is often one sentence long and is phrased as an arguable judgment. The claim will need to be proven and supported throughout your essay, but is simply an assertion at this point in the argumentative paper (“Argument,” 2011). 2 Qualifiers: Qualifiers are conditional terms such as “sometimes” or “often,” and focus your argument and prevent it from becoming too grandiose or absolute. For instance, an effective argument would likely not state: “All men wear blue.” To qualify this statement, the arguer would likely write, “Some men wear blue.” This assertion is far more reasonable when cushioned with a qualifier (“Argument,” 2011). 3 Grounds: The evidence you use to support your claim. Grounds could include data sets, definitions, examples, and outside information that bolsters your claim (“Argument,” 2011). 4 Warrant: Warrant is a term that is synonymous with assumption. Warrants in the Toulmin Model are the assumptions you, the writer, implicitly (unspoken or not clearly stated) or explicitly (spoken or written) hold about how you use evidence, or the grounds, to support your claim (“Argument,” 2011). 5 Backing: Your explanation of why you hold certain assumptions as the writer. If your assumptions are held by the audience you’re addressing, then you may not include your rationale for why your warrants, or assumptions, hold true (“Argument,” 2011). 6 Rebuttals: Rebuttals investigate and anticipate key weaknesses from your opponent (or opposing viewpoints). Rebuttals are pre-emptive since you, as the writer, consider how your opponents might respond to your claim before they do and then explain how their objections or interpretations are unfounded or incorrect (“Argument,” 2011). Conclusions: Do not simply restate your claim and rehash or summarize your points in the conclusion. Instead, in addition to a brief summary, explain why your rationale plus your evidence and rebuttals create a compelling case for the audience, your readers, to accept your argument.

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