Solution 1 Don Klumpp The Image Bank Getty Images Introduction to Ethics and Social Responsibility Learning Objectives At the end of this chapter you should
Solution Don Klumpp The Image Bank Getty Images Introduction to Ethics and Social Responsibility Learning Objectives At the end
Solution Don Klumpp The Image Bank Getty Images Introduction to Ethics and Social Responsibility
Image Bank Getty Images Introduction to Ethics and Social Responsibility Learning Objectives At the end of this chapter you should
Solution Don Klumpp The Image Bank Getty Images Introduction to Ethics and
Social Responsibility Learning Objectives At the end of this chapter you should
Solution Don Klumpp The Image Bank Getty Images Introduction
Solution Don Klumpp The
(Solution) 1 Don Klumpp/The Image Bank/Getty Images Introduction to Ethics and Social Responsibility Learning Objectives At the end of this chapter, you should...

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The purpose of tis discussion is to help you understand how to construct and ethical argument prepare and post a response to the following prompt:  *  Identify the basic themes, topics, and concepts that make up the discipline of ethic, explain the themes or ideas that unite the different ethical theories.*  Describe how you might apply one of the ethical theories or perspective we have discussed in this class one of the following social issues:*  Limiting smoking in public places, such as public building, restaurants, or city parks.*  Municipal governments using public funds to building stadiums for professional sport teams.*requiring a private land owner to provide habitat for endangered species on their properties.* In an effort to present a balanced discussion, describe and alternative perspective to the issue you have addressed.CHAPTER 1 Section 1.1 Why Study Ethics? Introduction P eople have worried about ethical questions—most simply stated, what is right and wrong—since the earliest of days. From the most basic, everyday concerns to the most important challenges a society can face, we confront these basic ethical ques- tions all the time. In the following pages, we will look at many such moral problems, as well as some of the ethical theories philosophers have offered to solve them. The study of ethics can be frustrating at times, largely because the problems dealt with rarely lead to a result that satisfies everyone. Hence, the arguments continue, new points are raised, old views are discarded, and we seem to go nowhere. But some of this frustra- tion can be alleviated when we realize that as long as people debate questions of right and wrong, these disagreements will persist. At the same time, however, we will discover that our understanding of those disagreements can be deepened and our abilities to reason about them improved. We may not solve all the ethical problems we confront, but we can make progress by solving some of them, and making clearer what is at stake in the prob- lems themselves. 1.1 Why Study Ethics? Y ou are standing in line at the movies, and someone cuts in front of you. Your child is sent home from school because what is written on her t-shirt is considered “inap- propriate.” You discover that your best friend is cheating on his wife. You are forced to pay taxes to support behavior you think is wrong. Your commanding officer punishes you for something you didn’t do. Your boss promotes a co-worker who took credit for work that was, in fact, done by you. You have a little extra money and, on your way to play the lottery, pass a homeless woman with her child. These situations illustrate some of the ethical situations we may confront that would force us to consider what we should do, and whether our response is good or bad, right or wrong, moral or immoral. The study of those problems constitutes the discipline of philosophy known as ethics. The study of ethics is ancient and can be found across all cultures and in all times that humans have lived in social groups. That people consider what is right and wrong, and what they ought to do, is fundamental to living in commu- nities. Thus, another way of thinking about ethics is that it is the study of “oughts” and “shoulds”—what ought I do, what should others do, what ought society do. Even though our focus in this text will be on the subject of ethics itself, we will also explore the long history of ethics and some of its important relationships with religious traditions and legal and political doctrines before we reach the conclusion of our readings. Recognizing how our philosophical concepts—particularly ethical concepts—inform and clarify our under- standing of religion, the law, and politics is important. At the same time, we all have what philosophers call moral intuitions . Intuitions, in the philosophical sense, are views that we hold, and share with others, without any specific argument or reasoning involved. They tend to be immediate and spontaneous. Perhaps you see an animal being treated with great cruelty, and you immediately and spontane- ously object to that treatment. This reflects your intuition that such cruelty is wrong; you don’t hesitate to consider the evidence and arguments involved—you simply react. Such intuitions are often correct, and the study of ethics can help support them by providing H1 TX_DC TX

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