Solution 1 GUIDELINES FOR WRITING A CASE STUDY ANALYSIS A case study analysis requires you to investigate a business problem examine the alternative
Solution GUIDELINES FOR WRITING A CASE STUDY ANALYSIS A case study analysis requires you to investigate a
Solution GUIDELINES FOR WRITING A CASE STUDY ANALYSIS A case study analysis requires
A CASE STUDY ANALYSIS A case study analysis requires you to investigate a business problem examine the alternative
Solution GUIDELINES FOR WRITING A CASE STUDY ANALYSIS A case study
analysis requires you to investigate a business problem examine the alternative
Solution GUIDELINES FOR WRITING A CASE STUDY ANALYSIS
Solution GUIDELINES FOR WRITING
(Solution) 1 GUIDELINES FOR WRITING A CASE STUDY ANALYSIS A case study analysis requires you to investigate a business problem, examine the alternative...

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Write your CASE STUDY in NOT LESS THAN 1000 words. You can use the given guide questions for each case to be able to compose your thoughts. use the guidelines in writing a case study thank you..Winning the BetInternational Game Technology (IGT) is a leading manufacturer of slot machines and lottery machines for casinos and government lotteries. Headquartered in Reno, Nevada, with sales headquarters in Las Vegas, the company also maintains sales, manufacturing, and service sites in Africa, Australia, Europe, and South America. Its Reno site alone produces 140,000 machines annually. It has been profitable for many years. In 2005, it had a profit of $437 million on revenue of $2.4 billion, apparently a situation that would lull executives of other companies to think "If it ain't broke, don't fix it." Not IGT managers.Until 2002, each business function had its own information system. IGT had different systems for handling sales, customer orders, manufacturing, and accounting. When managers wanted to receive information about a specific customer order, they had to go to each functional unit to receive a different piece of the information: customer details from the sales department, status of the machines being manufactured from the manufacturing units, and payment status from accounting. The accounting department itself had several software applications that handled different books, such as accounts receivable, accounts payable, and the general ledger. As business was growing, managers complained that they could not get comprehensive information on orders. The IT department developed interface software to connect the systems, but there were still complaints that information was not coherent. The IT specialists admitted that they were maintaining a mishmash of software. The loudest complaints came from the accountants. Every year it took them two weeks "to close the books." The accounting department pressured management to purchase a new system that would make their work more efficient. The CIO understood their plea but was afraid that satisfying this department's request would trigger similar requests from other units, such as engineering and manufacturing. The result might be a better information system for each department, but disparate systems that still were not connected to each other. On the CIO's advice, IGT management decided to implement an ERP system. A steering committee and project team were assembled. Their members focused on business functionality rather than the technology. After the first selection, systems from three companies were considered: SAP, Oracle, and J.D. Edwards (which was later acquired by Oracle). After further consideration,SAP won the contract, and IGT embarked on a two year effort. In 2003, the company switched to using theR/3 ERP system. IGT did not disclose the cost of the project, but analysts estimate it was well over $10 million.When the system was ready, three functions were incorporated into one enterprise system: product development, manufacturing, and finance. Like other ERP systems, R/3 is highly structured even when modified for a particular customer. As often happened, the new system forced IGT to change some of its business processes. However, the company chose SAP's system because it found it less rigid than other ERP systems.This was important to IGT, because it builds machines to order. The system afforded the company several benefits. Price proposals are made based on more accurate information and estimates. Managers on the manufacturing floor can view or print out manufacturing process sheets at their own PCs. Employees can no longer ignore specifications or "cut corners." The system does not allow a process to continue when an attempt such as this is made. The products are made more efficiently and with fewer errors. The system connects all of the company's sites around the globe. One of the system's modules is project management, which enables managers to monitor design changes and costs involved in new product development. The new system replaced the old MRP (material requirements planning) system, but the company still uses its internally developed factory control system, which has been successfully integrated into the SAP system. The factory control system enables managers to know which machines are built at which plant. IGT reduced the average period of order to shipping from 910 weeks to 78 weeks. When a rush order is entered, IGT can now fulfill it in four weeks instead of seven weeks. Between 2002 and 2005 the error rates in orders for raw materials decreased from 10 percent to almost 0. Inventory turn increased from 6.3 to 8.4 percent per year. IGT's CIO admits that the implementation was challenging. The company makes a variety of machines, which meant that many bills of materials had to be entered into the system (and new ones will have to be entered for new products). Adapting some features to the way IGT operates was not easy. However, the implementation was successful. The CIO credits the success to strong support from senior management, the establishment of a steering committee with members from all affected units, a capable project management team, a training program to help employees understand how to use the new system, and the rigorous testing the system underwent before it was used.1 GUIDELINES FOR WRITING A CASE STUDY ANALYSIS A case study analysis requires you to investigate a business problem, examine the alternative solutions, and propose the most effective solution using supporting evidence. To see an annotated sample of a Case Study Analysis, click here. Preparing the Case Before you begin writing, follow these guidelines to help you prepare and understand the case study: 1. Read and examine the case thoroughly • Take notes, highlight relevant facts, underline key problems. 2. Focus your analysis • Identify two to five key problems • Why do they exist? • How do they impact the organization? • Who is responsible for them? 3. Uncover possible solutions • Review course readings, discussions, outside research, your experience. 4. Select the best solution • Consider strong supporting evidence, pros, and cons: is this solution realistic? Drafting the Case Once you have gathered the necessary information, a draft of your analysis should include these sections: 1. Introduction • Identify the key problems and issues in the case study. • Formulate and include a thesis statement, summarizing the outcome of your analysis in 1–2 sentences. 2. Background • Set the scene: background information, relevant facts, and the most important issues. • Demonstrate that you have researched the problems in this case study. Created in 2015

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