Solution 1 HUMN 330 Values and Ethics Personal Reflection on Values and Ethics Assignment Guidelines Erik Erikson one of the most influential psychoanalysts
Solution HUMN Values and Ethics Personal Reflection on Values and Ethics Assignment Guidelines Erik Erikson one
Solution HUMN Values and Ethics Personal Reflection on Values and Ethics Assignment
Ethics Personal Reflection on Values and Ethics Assignment Guidelines Erik Erikson one of the most influential psychoanalysts
Solution HUMN Values and Ethics Personal Reflection on Values and
Ethics Assignment Guidelines Erik Erikson one of the most influential psychoanalysts
Solution HUMN Values and Ethics Personal Reflection on
Solution HUMN Values and
(Solution) 1 HUMN 330 Values and Ethics Personal Reflection on Values and Ethics Assignment Guidelines Erik Erikson, one of the most influential psychoanalysts...

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1.  submit your values and ethics reflection paper by the end of Module 9. The objective of this assignment is for you to relate the material from the textbook readings and course discussions to the experiences in your life so that you can assess its meaning. Read the assignment guidelines carefully. Personal Reflection on Values and Ethics Assignment Guidelines (PDF)Rubric HUMN 330 Reflection Paper Rubric Introduction (5%) view longer description Proficient (4-5 Points) - Clearly provides all necessary information and sets expectations. Includes a statement that clearly presents an overall picture of student’s values and ethics5.0 pts Satisfactory (2-3 Points) - Minor lack or excess of information; minor lack of clarity. Includes a statement that adequately presents an overall picture of student’s values and ethics3.0 pts Poor (0-1 Point) - Confusing, vague or lacking; does not include a statement that presents an overall picture of the student’s values and ethics or this statement is vague1.0 pts 5.0 pts Body Structure (5%) view longer description Proficient (4-5 Points) - Paragraphs consistently meet expectations; transitions very clear5.0 pts Satisfactory (2-3 Points) - 1-3 lapses in paragraphs; 1-3 problems with transitions3.0 pts Poor (0-1 Point) - So many lapses in paragraphs or problems with transitions that comprehension is difficult1.0 pts 5.0 pts Conclusion (5%) view longer description Proficient (4-5 Points) - Ends paper with powerful impact; creates a fully satisfying sense of completion5.0 pts Satisfactory (2-3 Points) - Ending works, but may be weak or does not create a good sense of completion3.0 pts Poor (0-1 Point) - Weak, confusing or missing ending1.0 pts 5.0 pts Content (30%) view longer description Proficient (25-30 Points) - Paper carefully and thoroughly responds to all aspects of the topic30.0 pts Satisfactory (18-24 Points) - Paper adequately responds to the topic; length is adequate to address the topic24.0 pts Poor (0-17 Points) - Paper does not respond effectively to the topic; length is insufficient to adequately address the topic17.0 pts 30.0 pts Vocabulary (10%) view longer description Proficient (9-10 Points) - Skillful word choice that is precise, purposeful and always appropriate in formality10.0 pts Satisfactory (7-8 Points) - Relatively few minor errors8.0 pts Poor (0-6 Points) - So many errors that writing is difficult to comprehend or offensive or irrelevant6.0 pts 10.0 pts Writing Style (10%) view longer description Proficient (9-10 Points) - Pleasing variety of sentence constructions; always effective and appropriate brevity, use of parallelism and/or poetic effects10.0 pts Satisfactory (7-8 Points) - Relatively few minor errors8.0 pts Poor (0-6 Points) - Errors detract significantly from comprehension or create significant distractions6.0 pts 10.0 pts Grammar (10%) view longer description Proficient (9-10 Points) - Few to no errors (1% or less of assignment word total)10.0 pts Satisfactory (7-8 Points) - Some errors (less than 5% of word total)8.0 pts Poor (0-6 Points) - Errors detract significantly from comprehension6.0 pts 10.0 pts Sources - Number, Quality and Variety (10%) view longer description Proficient (9-10 Points) - Effort beyond expectations; material from the readings is well-chosen and effectively integrated. Possible use of additional sources.10.0 pts Satisfactory (7-8 Points) - Adequate integration of material from the readings into the paper.8.0 pts Poor (0-6 Points) - Does not incorporate material from the readings into the paper.6.0 pts 10.0 pts Sources - Integration and Citation (15%) view longer description Proficient (13-15 Points) - Sources interspersed with writer’s own analysis or synthesis; quotes are less than 10% of paper; 1-5 minor errors in documentation15.0 pts Satisfactory (10-12 Points) - Sources interspersed with writer’s own work; quotes are less than 20% of paper; more than 5 minor errors in documentation12.0 pts Poor (0-9 Points) - Sources strung together with little of the writer’s own work; quotes are 50% or more of paper; citations missing or with major errors; plagiarism9.0 pts 15.0 pts GENED_SLO4_Communication view longer description threshold: 1.0 pts Meets Expectations1.0 pts Does Not Meet Expectations0.0 pts --  GENED_SLO7_Lifelong Personal Growth view longer description threshold: 1.0 pts Meets Expectations1.0 pts Does Not Meet Expectations0.0 pts -- Total Points:100.01 0815 HUMN 330 Values and Ethics Personal Reflection on Values and Ethics Assignment Guidelines Erik Erikson, one of the most influential psychoanalysts of the 20th century, proposed an eight- stage theory of growth as a model for how we live, think, learn and change throughout our lifetimes. What we value, our character and psyche are determined as a result of the developmental tasks we face in each stage. For more information on his stages see: http://swppr.org/Textbook/Ch%209%20Erikson.pdf Erikson’s last stage is sometimes referred to as late adulthood, maturity, or old age (Erikson’s term is Ego Integrity vs. Despair), and begins around the age of 60 or when we typically retire. According to his theory, during this final stage of life we take a deep inventory of our lives and our sense of usefulness. The basic question most people grapple with at this stage is: did our life have meaning? However, we do not need to wait until the latter part of our life to answer this question. We can do it now! Some people become preoccupied with the past, their failures, regrets, and the bad decisions they made, knowing they do not have the time or the vigor to reverse how they lived and treated others. Sometimes this results in people becoming depressed, vindictive, resentful and spiteful in old age. They often wish that they had lived a life that was different, more positive and had deeper meaning. Conversely, others look back and accept the choices they made, realizing they did their best given the choices they had and the circumstances they faced. If you were dying now, into which category would you place yourself? While most of us are not dying, we do know that we are not guaranteed a tomorrow. In fact, we cannot even be sure we will live through the day. Yet, in the face of the one certainty in life we all share—that everything outside of the imminent moments in which we live and breathe— Western society continues to deny the presence and possibilities of death. This is true even when we are directly confronted with it—witness, for example, the lengths to which we will go to live longer even when those measures vastly deteriorate the quality of our lives. Rather, as the essential, defining element of life itself, death should be embraced as a means of learning how to live a full and truly meaningful life. So, perhaps now is a good time to reflect and take an inventory of how we have lived. Our personal values, morals and ethical code serve as a basis for distinguishing between right and wrong, and thereby have a direct effect upon our thoughts, behavior and emotions. Of course our family, upbringing, peers, and education play a critical role in the development of our core values and ethics as well, but as you learned in this course, there are many other variables that shape our character and values. The objective of this assignment is for you to relate the material from the textbook readings and course discussions to the experiences in your life so that you can assess its meaning. As we reflect on acknowledging our mortality, can we start to bring a greater meaning to our lives while still living? We can if we are honest with ourselves and take the time to do so. So, how do we go about determining what our values and ethics are? Perhaps the best approach is to start with developing a statement that encompasses an overall picture of your values and ethics. This opening part of your paper needs to be general in nature and should

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